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What are “Fillers” or “Other Ingredients” in Supplements?

What are “Fillers” or “Other Ingredients” in Supplements?

Nutritional Label and Law

By law, all supplements and medicines must include in the label vitamins, minerals, or herbs they contain, as well as the amount of each of these. But there is a section of the label that not too many pay attention to, called “Other Ingredients”.

In this section, the ingredients do not show the quantity or indication of what they can actually cause. These ingredients are usually called "Fillers". These have several purposes such as: preserving the medicine, help to extend the shelf life, help bind the tablets, allow supplements to run through manufacturing machines more easily without clumping and sticking during the manufacturing process, facilitate its intake or regulate the way they are going to act in our body.

Why are Fillers used?

Fillers or excipients can be used in the following ways:

- Act as preservatives or antioxidants

- Increase the volume of the formula as sometimes the amounts per dose is very small.

- They can improve the taste, smell, and appearance of the drug.

- They improve the amount of drug that will reach the bloodstream.

- Improve the integrity of the supplement or drug, adding coatings or enamels.

- Help to extend the shelf life.

These substances are capable of causing side or unwanted effects when consumed. Ideally, the excipients do not produce toxic effects in the body, and it is when on certain occasions it can cause health problems in allergic people, diabetics, intolerant to certain foods, and more.

Which are the most common Fillers?

Preservatives: They are commonly used in medications to extend their life and to help prevent the growth of microorganisms or microbial contamination. Some can cause asthma, cancer and heart disease. Harvard Health Publishing says preservatives are everywhere and impossible to avoid completely. Always prefer that your dietary supplements come without preservatives.’

 

Silicon Dioxide: Silicon dioxide absorbs moisture, making it a popular anticaking agent and flow enhancer. It is naturally found in sand, which may not seem like something you want to put in your body. Still, there is no evidence that it can cause any harm within your body. However, one concern is that nanoparticles of silicon dioxide may trigger GI problems.

Magnesium Stearate: Is another additive that is used mainly in capsules of medicines and supplements. It is considered a "flowing agent". It prevents the individual ingredients in a capsule from sticking together and to the machine that creates the capsules. There is a concern with stearic acid, the main component of the common bulking agent, of affecting your immune cells or T-cells, by selectively inhibiting T-dependent immune responses.

Titanium Dioxide: Titanium dioxide is a whitening agent that is used in many cosmetic products as well as in dietary supplements. It is banned in Europe as it is considered possibly carcinogenic.

Artificial Colors and Flavors: They are sometimes included to improve the appearance and taste of supplements. There is some fear on the part of the nutrition communities, that these ingredients can be harmful, so it is best to avoid if possible.

There are many types of fillers and excipients, not all of them are bad. It is important to read before consuming supplements and medications to know exactly what you are ingesting, and also to evaluate the need for them to avoid consuming them if you can.

Mannuki Nutrition´s Premium Supplements With NO Fillers

We are obsessed over the ingredients that go into our products and are even more fixated on the things we keep out of them, that is why our capsules come as clean as possible from ingredients that can cause harm to your health. Through continuous innovation, Mannuki Nutrition offers dietary supplements of the best possible quality.

 

*Health Disclaimer:

This blog provides general information and discussions about health and related subjects. The information and other content provided in this blog, or in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice, nor is the information a substitute for professional medical expertise or treatment. If you or any other person has a medical concern, you should consult with your health care provider or seek other professional medical treatment. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something that have read on this blog or in any linked materials. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or emergency services immediately.

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